The Story Behind the Song Parts 6 and 7: Children”

There was a time, before I grew up and became a child again, when I was no longer a musician. Following The Boys I flirted with mega stardom among the posh girls of Kensington and Chelsea with a band called The Hollywood Killers, but the all consuming self belief and ambition you need to dedicate your life to music had gone.

And so began a difficult period of going back to University (which you may recall I had left previously after a day to dedicate myself to being a punk rocker -much to the delight of my father) and then on to a career in business.  Eventually I found myself working for Andrew Lloyd Webber as “business development manager”. It was an exciting job at a time of huge success for that giant of the Musical Theatre. I was part of the team responsible for bringing shows to new countries, which is more complicated than it sounds. If there is no history of Broadway/London musicals in a country it’s hard to find actors who can sing, act and dance at the same time. It was often quicker and easier at first to send British and American cast to a new country and teach them the local language than teach local actors a tradition they hadn’t been trained for.

And how do you get tickets on sale throughout a whole region when no infrastructure exists for that? It had to be created from scratch. Many countries owe their networks of ticket shops to work we put in at the time.

If I wasn’t working on shows I might be working on films of the shows, a new world for me at that time. Or I might be buying and renovating a new theatre in the West End or a new mega hotel/theatre complex in Las Vegas.

The job involved a lot of travelling. For almost a year I would leave on a Monday before dawn to fly to Switzerland where we were putting on The Phantom of the Opera, catch the train to Wiesbaden in Germany on a Tuesday or Wednesday night, where a theatre to house Sunset Boulevard was being built, and return home exhausted late on Friday night to London. If I wasn’t on the road I’d be in the office early on the phone to somewhere like Japan or Australia who were ahead of us on the clock, and then still there late, talking to New York or LA who were behind and for whom my 8pm was their midday.

All in all it was exciting and challenging. But there was an aspect to it which made my heart ache -Lauren. In the middle of my post music life we’d had a daughter, and what a difference that monumental event had made. A little bundle of life who depended on us totally and provoked the most powerful emotions I’d ever felt.

So I worked hard to create a future for her and us. I put up with the trains into London which broke down, were cancelled late at night or went on strike causing a particular type of hell for 10 million people trying to get home for a precious few snatched minutes with loved ones before they went to bed. I put up with the work stress which was intense (oh no, the theatre in Germany is going to be late, so the Sunset Boulevard team won’t get to LA on time which means that show will be late and so will Sydney and then the revamp in London -it’s going to cost millions, it’s going to be a worldwide news story of how the show has failed and it’s all my fault …..help??????).

And ironically the harder I worked to create a future, the more I missed of Lauren growing up. But there were no times better than the times when I’d get home to catch her before bedtime. I’d put the key in the door and the toddler knew it was me. I’d hear feet come running and before I was through the door a little bundle of unquestioning love was there to give me a hug and a kiss. Everything made sense in those moments. We are programmed for it.

Years later I looked back on those earth moving times as inspiration for a song. “Lauren” had one too many syllables for the melody and so became “Jack” in “Little Fingers and Toes”. If you have Spotify you can listen here:

And if not, listen for free on Bandcamp here: Little Fingers and Toes

But children grow up. They need to become independent, and they need to make you let go, since you’ll never let go yourself. As for many, it happened when Lauren went to University. New freedom for her, new friends, a new life and no need for parents.

A momentous day, the day she left home for the first time. Packing belongings into the car for a little girl who was the centre of our life, and later, hanging on for calls to hear news of what was going on in hers. A bitter sweet time. A bitter loss in one sense, although not really as I would later discover that, just as a teenager had replaced the toddler, a fantastic, mature adult would replace the teenager. But also a sweet feeling that the hard work had been worthwhile, as the child could stand on her own two feet and make her way in the world.

To hear chapter two of this domestic soap opera here is “Long Long Gone”:

or on Bandcamp: Long Long Gone

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An Evening for Debbie and Carl

DebbieCarl2
Debbie and Carl before it all started

Some people just deserve a break and we want to ask you to help us give one.

Debbie and Carl North are two of the most generous, kind hearted people you will meet. Carl is a big Chelsea fan but for the purposes of this message I would ask you to put that to the back of your mind and forgive him.

Debbie, on the other hand, has absolutely no faults at all.

Debbie has been in the wars for a few years now. It started off as a mystery illness which stopped her working and became worse from there. Just recently Carl has been able to take her out of the house in a wheelchair but a stroke kept her prisoner at home for over a year.

Debbie
Debbie with some very fine Birthday presents

I won’t go fully into Debbie’s symptoms as they are just too many but among the worst is that, for a women who likes to natter (and boy does she like to natter), she can’t communicate.

Earning money in this time, with Carl required to be a full time carer, hasn’t been easy especially as Debbie had to give up work as a newly qualified lawyer.

So, on December 7 everyone involved with our show at The Brighton Electric (Plague UKStone Heroes and Change Persona) have decided to make it a benefit for Debbie and Carl.

It’s a great little venue with the best sound I’ve ever heard. There are details here on the facebook event page including a ticket link.

So: please try to make a trip to Brighton to support the cause if you can. It’s a great seaside town for a pre-Christmas trip. If you can’t make it, perhaps consider buying a ticket anyway, whether or not as a present for someone who can get along.

So, let’s have a great time and raise some money to give Debbie and Carl a break

Brighton Electric
Brighton Electric -see you there!

 

 

We’ve Got New Shirts and Bags (apologies to my old English teacher!)

We’ve got a lot (oops I’ve done it again twice!) of new shirts with our glorious mugs on and bags to go out with.

Available from our Bandcamp shop here but far better, if you buy direct by sending an email to duncan@littlebighead.co.uk, you’ll save the cost of post.

Black Bag
Black Bag
Purple Bag
Purple Bag
Shirt
T Shirts available in all sizes

 

In Praise of WFMU

Let’s face it. Mainstream radio is rubbish, isn’t it? Commercial radio is like an iPod on shuffle, but with only 10 songs of the same genre interspersed with ads. There are public broadcasters who are a little more interesting, certainly with the odd entertaining DJ, but they are still scared of not being “down with the kids” or of only playing well-known oldies.

The situation is saved, though, by a host of largely unpaid heroes on the internet. This is by no means an exhaustive list but those heroes include:

Keith Newman, Punky Paul and Lisa Etherton – two smutty, 50-year-old teenagers and a sex therapist, masquerading as “New Wave with Newman” on Radio Northumberland.

Newman
Two smutty 50 year old teenagers and a sex therapist

Peter Antony, Beatles and Stones fan, but also champion of many young Rock bands on Radio CarolineUnited DJs, and Q Burn.

Diego RJ, or El Sotano who has a national, drive time FM show in Spain playing punk, power pop and garage.

Stephen Doyle on Salford City Radio, Gary Crowley on BBC Radio London and Soho Radio, Paula Frost at Way Out RadioMike Rogers with his Tokyo breakfast show on acid, Dave RenegadeDanny MacThe Alternative Aycliffe Punk Radio Show ………… the list goes on and I apologise if I’ve left you off, there are so many of you. All of these presenters have a passion for music and a particular taste which makes the listener feel they are listening to a curator who loves what they play, rather than an ego with a playlist. They are, however, islands on their particular stations, isolated hours on say a Monday evening or a Tuesday afternoon.

But in Jersey City there is a whole FM radio station, funded by its listeners so it has no ads and therefore no pressure to deliver particular listener demographics and where the DJs just play whatever they like. WFMU can be heard across the whole of New York, a large part of New Jersey and online here.

And what a weird mixture it is. A bit like having a whole station of John Peels. And, like that long missed purveyor of the obscure, parts of it are unlistenable. But much of it is exciting especially if, like me, you seek good new music.

It was the saturday afternoon presenter Todd-o-phonic Todd who made our recent shows on the East Coast possible and we played a set on Evan “Funk” Davies’ Wednesday evening show. Both of these fellas have impeccable taste and are afficianados of glam, punk, garage and power pop.

Underneath the station they have a fine venue, Monty Hall,  which, like the radio station, is staffed by volunteers. It has no liquor licence so people bring their own beer and as part of the service they film the whole show, edit and mix it to a professional standard and give a copy to the band. That is worth thousands of dollars to those who play there.

Here’s a couple of excerpts from our show:

So, long may WFMU continue, a bastion of the weird and individual in this increasingly uniform and corporate media world.

PS: There is a footnote to our show at Monty Hall.

The traffic from Manhatten to Jersey City is horrific. About 10 roads converge into 2 lanes as you approach the Holland Tunnel to pass under the Hudson to New Jersey in a frustrating and nervewracking crawl, hoping against hope that you’ll move forward more in the next hour than the 400 metres you managed in the last. Cops with improbably large backsides lurk as you approach junctions, happily awarding you a $100 dollar fine if you get caught inadvertently blocking the route of cars approaching in another direction. If you need to be in Jersey City at 7pm it makes sense to go there at 3pm when the traffic isn’t quite so voluminous.

So Sophie, myself and Camille Phillips (stepping in for Karen Jones who couldn’t make the trip) arrived in Jersey City at 4pm with a few hours to spare and headed for a local bar.

Without realising the effect we would have, we entered the establishment in V formation. Myself at the apex: purple/pink suit, red shoes, floral shirt. I was flanked by Sophie to my left: leather jacket, T shirt, long black hair, hot pants, black tights and Doc Martens, and to my right, Camille: leather jacket, tatoos, boots and chains.The bar fell silent. The security fellas checked the bulges in their inside, jacket pockets. From the party of older ladies having a birthday celebration in the corner we heard:

  • “Check the pink guy!”.
  • “What is he?”.
  • “He’s a pimp!”.
  • “No, he’s a gangster, stay out of his way”
  • “He’s English”
  • “They’re the worst”

We chose a table and sat down. A very kind waitress brought over some water and placed a glass in front of Camille. As a joke I said: “She’s not allowed that!”.

“I’m so sorry, I’m really, really sorry”, said the waitress,”I promise I won’t do it again”, quickly removing the offending item. “What is she allowed to have?”, “Scotch”, I said which arrived in approximately 30 seconds flat.

So, moral of the story: if you are a shortass wimp in New Jersey and want the respect of security guards, to strike fear into the hearts of matrons and lightening quick service from terrified waitresses, dress up in pink and get yourself a posse of striking looking women.

Works every time.

A Review from the Valleys

Last week we played Bristol, Boardmasters Festival (to huge acclaim I must add)  and Abertillery in the beautiful valleys of Wales. A fella called John Lovell was in Bristol and Wales. We had a chat at both shows and afterwards he sent me this review. “Please rewrite it”, he said, “and don’t mention my name”. Clearly a man of great confidence.

In fact, I enjoyed the piece which evoked the evening so much I didn’t change a word. And, as for not mentioning his name, …………. Ooops!

Here it is:

A Lunchtime Superstar and his Big Heads…

Without being labelled a stalker this was the second time I’d seen Duncan Reid and the Bigheads over the August weekend.

First being at the Louisiana in Bristol on Thursday.

There was a third gig at the huge Boardmasters festival in Cornwall but I gave this a miss (the thought of mixing with 50,000 unkempt surfers and teenagers!).

I’d seen this line up of Duncan Reid, Nick Hughes, Karen Jones and Sophie K Powers a few times over the past year and they are by far the best.

I knew the band were playing Bristol from their Facebook page but didn’t know about Abertilly (as the non Welsh speaking pronounce it) till after reading an article in the South Wales Argus by Leah Powell.

Abertillery met me with a greeting of typical Welsh sunshine. It was pouring down!

Welsh Rain
Rain closes in over the beautiful Welsh hills

I eventually found The Dolls House via the satnav and surprised myself by the location and surroundings.

The Dolls House
The Dolls House, Abertillery (note the car crash: Welsh drivers are adventurous)

Houses and mountains. Loads and loads of big Welsh wet mountains with lashings of rain.

Third gig for the band and a very different view.

Bristol with all the shops and road works and, I expect, Boardmasters with sunshine and blue sea.

Paid a few quid to a guy on the door and got a nice black stamp on the back of my hand. No ticket stub to add to my memorabilia.

The venue was downstairs, a compact area with a small stage, bar, dance floor, tables and chairs at the back which the bands used as a set up for their merchandise.

Met and had time to chat to Duncan who always finds time to talk. Usually the chat is after the gig.

The first of the two support acts went on and one song didn’t half sound like Honest John Plain’s “New Guitar “…

When they completed their set, Duncan chatted about songs he had written for his forthcoming fourth Big Head record.

The second support act (Plague UK) played and that’s when it struck me that The Bigheads wouldn’t be on till way past 10pm.

I’d put some pics on facebook from Bristol with the title “First Time I’d seen Duncan Reid and the Bigheads sober”: very ambiguous.

This time we all were sober (all driving home after), and first time I’d had free drinks in a pub even if it was only soda water.

The band opened with “Can’t Stop”, straight into “Montevideo”, “Soda Pressing” and “C’est La Vie”.

Then came “Baby Doll”, ”Let’s Skip to the Good Bit”, “Thinking” and “Just Because You’re Paranoid”.. but for the love of me can’t remember the banter during the pause in “Thinking”..

They were speeding through them and it wouldn’t have been believed that they had previously played the West of England and traveled hundreds of miles.

Cod piece in Wales
“Speeding through them” with a sock down the trousers!

“Rolling On” was next and there was some banter which included new lyrics featuring tequila and almost a version of rawhide!

It was hot, humid and sweaty. Duncan took his jacket off and chatted about the travels of the Welsh flag seen at many a gig.

Welsh Flag
The Welsh Flag gets another outing

 

He was going to speak some Welsh taught to him by Sophie, the non-rude translation being “I love to eat cornish cheese bell quays”. The literal translation is not fit for a family publication!

An introduction of the band members followed and somehow they all became Jones or Evans: quite apt for Abertillery.

The venue like many others is under threat from residents which seems a little unfair as the wedding party from upstairs joined in, but to the disappointment of the band, failed to bring down any food.

Looking round there were wedding guests dancing in the hall and children’s faces pressed against the doors’ glass windows.

People started to drift in after hearing the music blasting onto the street.

Not sure but maybe those living nearby opened their windows. Rain or no rain, I would have. Maybe the Bigheads saved the Doll?

“Rolling on” was followed by “Bombs Away” which saw Duncan throw in some well-rehearsed choreography moves pointing to each guitar player.

Some more “Boys” tunes followed in “Brickfield” and “First Time” which got the crowd singing and jumping, and “Terminal love”, the Old Grey Whistle Test guitar version, my favourite.

Duncan joined the crowd during “First Time” doing well to avoid the water on the floor from the air conditioning unit above the front of the stage.

After a few more it was into the encore: “That’s the Way it is”, “Shortest Song in the World” (three times), “One Night in Rio” and “Sick on You”.

One of the best performances from the band I have seen and, looking at their smiles and the body language between them all, they did as well.

At the end they looked exhausted.  I took about five photos of the evening: unknown for me to take so few, and the reason why? It’s hard to snap when you’re singing and jumping.

I know they went down well with a good Welsh crowd from seeing the people round the merchandise table at the end of the gig.

They liked The Kid and hope he comes back with his Big Heads sometime in the future, and there is a future for The Dolls House.

So, a fourth album in the pipeline, the songs are gonna have to be belters to get any chance featuring in any future Big Heads sets..

Sorry Duncan you’re going to have to play the set faster or longer 😉

End of Line T Shirt Give Away

We have just a handful of the following shirts left so we are giving them away for the price of the post (which is about £2).

If you would like one please email duncan@littlebighead.co.uk with the model and size you would like and your address. We’ll give you the amount of post to pay by PayPal and send it to you. Simple as that! There aren’t many though so get in quick.

Here they are:

  1. Purple “Thinking”: Sizes available: XL (Now SOLD OUT), Small, Ladies Large (All Gone!), Ladies Medium (All Gone) and Ladies Small
Purple Mock
Purple Thinking

2. Black “Thinking”: Sizes available: Small and Ladies Large (Ladies Large now SOLD OUT) Reid Idea

Black Thinking

3. Black “Action”: Sizes available: Ladies Medium and Small

pop art
Black Action

4. Purple “Action”: sizes available: Small. (All gone)

Purple Action
Purple Action

5. Black Guitar control: Size available: Small (Now SOLD OUT)

black Mock Grain
Black Guitar Control

 

The Story Behind the Song Part 5: Another City

Looking out on a freezing London spring my mind drifts back to a day spent with my great friend, supporter and talented artist, David Apps , taking photos for the album cover of Little Big Head.

It was a cold day, then as now, and I had the bright idea of taking snaps on the Thames Clipper, a fleet of boats which pass up and down the River Thames, through the heart of London, as part of the public transport system. If you visit London the Clipper is the best few pounds you can spend. First take the Docklands Light Railway from Bank to Greenwich. This is pronounced grenitch in that illogical way that Londoners invented purely to mystify American tourists -see also Marylebone, pronounced marlibone with no Mary in it, and Madame Tussaud’s, pronounced two swords. At Greenwich wander round this historic oasis of old world charm, a rare South London survivor from the ravages of WW2, and then past the Cutty Sark, a preserved tea ship which looks like it ran aground from The Pirates of the Caribbean.

From there you’ll reach Greenwich Pier and can alight the clipper in the direction of Embankment, to partake of the best near free show in London. The Thames viewed from the river is magnificent. Best seen at night, some inspirational lighting shows off such treasures as The Tower of LondonTower BridgeShakespeare’s Globe Theatre, and a host of other beauties too numerous to mention.

 

IMG_0282
“Riding on the Clipper”: it was cold!

 

 

Much to the curiosity and amusement of passing tourists (“who are you?”, “What are you doing this for?”, “I love your shoes!”) Dave and I took some snaps around Greenwich, The National Theatre, and on the clipper. But the best was reserved for the jetty at Embankment.

IMG_0217
Posing at Greenwich
Tables
And the National Theatre: “I love your shoes!”

At that casting off point on a Saturday, party boats galore take gangs of Hen Parties and Stag Dos off down the river for bacchanalian nights of drunken reverie. At about 7pm the evening had not yet started so hens were not yet mingled with stags. Rather the two were in separate groups, eyeing each other from their own territory, the boys drinking cans of beer and the girls laughing as they waited for the boat. We took some shots but by this time I was frozen right through to my eyes.

Another City
Frozen to my Eyes in front of Hen Party girls from Glasgow

Shivering by the water, we called it a day and strolled across Trafalgar Square and up St Martin’s Lane to The 12 Bar Club in Denmark Street, previous centre of London’s  Music Land. Most of Denmark Street has now been redeveloped and certainly the 12 Bar is no more. Back then it was a dark refuge for London’s rockers and home to the highest, smallest and therefore easiest to fall off stage in the world.

And so I thought: “I can’t call another city home” a line which stuck with me and grew into the song “Another City” on “The Difficult Second Album”.

For those of you blessed with Spotify you can hear the song here:

 

If you don’t have Spotify you can hear it on our bandcamp page HERE